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Our New Millennial Blog.

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Category: Changing Demographics

We have some exciting news for the Center for the Study of the Workplace! As part of our ongoing effort to develop a comprehensive understanding of the world of work, we are expanding our scope to include insights from Generation Y. How do young professionals, who may have just graduated and started their first “real job,” understand leadership? How do new graduates feel their education has affected them? Should post-grads consider a Master’s program?

There are no concrete answers to these questions, but as the discussion progresses we can begin understanding the perspective of a new generation of workers.

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Success Depends on Strong Succession Planning.

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Category: Professional Perspectives

Download the video transcript.

Pat Nazemetz, former Chief Ethics Officer at the Xerox Corporation, believes succession planning, although often neglected, is vital to every organization. Of course succession planning and succession development are two distinct processes, and companies (or board members, rather) often focus on planning at the expense of development. Succession planning could really be another facet of talent development. Spot talent early with easy-to-use metrics and begin coaching leaders to move through the company and gain as much experience as possible.

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What can I tell you about leadership?

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Category: Leadership

In April of 2011, I retired as the Managing Director of the Milwaukee County Transit System. My career there spanned almost 32 years and allowed me to do everything from counting bus passengers to negotiating contracts.  MCTS is a publicly funded organization, managed by a private non-profit company, with 1100 employees, a $175 million dollar budget, and a mission to serve the public.  Steering that ship was a challenge; it was also a blessing and a great learning experience!

  • Being in charge can be a lot of fun.  It can also give you nightmares and gray hair — especially if you care about the people you work with and those that you serve. It isn’t as easy as it looks, but not much that is worth doing is!
  • A leader has to get people moving in the same direction, either through collaboration or command.  If they aren’t rowing with you, they are rowing against you — even still oars hold the boat back.
  • There are lots of different styles of leadership.  You have to know what fits best with your personality (the easy part) and with the organization that you are attempting to lead (a little more of a challenge).  Organizations are made up of people and people have thoughts and ideas and feeling and agendas that don’t always mesh well with yours.   Sometimes leadership feels like herding cats!
  • My favored leadership style involves collaboration and a willingness to listen and to learn. It is a great leadership style when you have sufficient time.  When you don’t, you just have to move forward on your own and hope that your team will understand and follow, because you have built an atmosphere of trust and respect.
  • Communication is a tricky thing, especially in our virtual world.  You need communication to get your team onboard, but no message is just for a specific audience any more.  Your competitors, detractors, and even your mother will know anything that is communicated to your employees.
  • The speed of communication has changed the parameters of leadership.  There just isn’t time to weigh and measure each response to every issue.  Often the media knows about an incident before you do, and they expect a response NOW.  The sooner you learn to live with that, the more successful you will be.
  • It is true that “What gets measured gets done”. The hardest part is to make sure you are measuring the right things with the right measures.  You can also get so caught up in measuring the details that you miss the big trends; so don’t forget to look beyond those parameters sometimes.
  • Leaders often have to make decisions with incomplete information.  That’s what a leader is – someone who has the courage to move forward in the face of uncertainty; to determine a course and to lay out a strategy to get the rest of the organization moving along with you in that direction.  Not deciding is a decision…and it is often the wrong one.
  • Success and failure come and go, often with forces that are outside of your control. In the end all you have is your integrity and your reputation, so don’t abandon those too easily, despite what Donald Trump says!
  • I was lucky…an anomaly.  My career was blessed with a 30+ year growing experience in an organization that focused on a mission that I truly believed in — providing public transportation to the community. I had the opportunity to learn from some great leaders and the opportunity to row really fast to keep everything afloat.  Take every opportunity to learn what you can and always keep moving forward!
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