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Global Workforce: Creating a Global Mindset.

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Category: Academic Insights

Achieving a balance between the time devoted to family and to work is difficult for anyone. But if that needs to be done in a foreign country, the task is even harder.

As the Richard C. Notebaert Distinguished Chair of International Business and Global Studies, Dr. Margaret Shaffer has undertaken research that focuses on understanding cross-cultural experiences, especially in the areas of expatriate adjustment and performance and life balance. She teaches in the graduate and undergraduate programs in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lubar School of Business.

In the video she states that both corporate expatriates and self-expatriates have found it easier to work globally; the barriers to work in different countries are less now than ever before. In her opinion, workers simply need to create a global mindset as well as global knowledge and expertise. According to Shaffer, these skills will allow employees to operate easily with a broad range of customers and suppliers from across the world.

The Center for the Study of the Workplace shares some of Dr. Shaffer’s research findings.  A model of expatriation and family performance can be retrieved by clicking here, while the influence of expatriation on career advancement can be found by clicking here.

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Generations and Geography by Moxie Insight.

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Category: Research

Contemporary businesses must recognize, harness, and develop talented employees within a diverse, global workforce. The inherent differences between individuals from a different culture or even from a different generation are opportunities for leaders to consider and utilize multiple perspectives on how to innovate.

Capitalizing on these differences requires a knowledge and understanding of what motivates people from different cultures and generations. Approaching an emerging market with only a Western organizational model can quickly stymie efficient and creative problem solving.

Tammy Erickson and Timothy Bevins of Moxie Insight write more on this topic in this month’s featured White Paper. Read the abstract below and visit moxieinsight.com to download the full paper.

Abstract:

Many of our most powerful and lasting beliefs are formed when we are teenagers, when we first shift our focus from tangible objects and begin to wrestle with the values and ideas in the world around us. What we see and hear—and the conclusions we draw—influence for our lifetimes what we value, how we measure success, whom we trust, and the priorities we set for our own lives, including
the role work will play within them. Each country’s unique social, political, and economic events shaped specific views and attitudes among today’s adults. Understanding these country-to-country differences is critical to creating employment deals that attract and retain the best employees in each geographic area. Western generational models cannot be applied broadly to a global workforce.

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